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1232 Winter Garden Vineland Road Suite 116

Winter Garden, FL 34787

 

Phone: 407-347-7977

1232 Winter Garden Vineland Road

Suite 116

Winter Garden, FL 34787

407-900-5348

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About Trinity Sports Performance

If you are looking for the highest level of sports performance training in Orlando or sports specific training you have found the place. Our sports trainers work with children ages 13 years and up, high school athletes and college athletes.We have many custom workout options for them to train privately or in small groups or classes.

 

Our 'PERFORMANCE FIT' training philosophy is simple: Provide our athletes with the most effective, up-to-date education, training techniques, technology and coaching in a motivating, engaging training environment fostering unmatched results. Our elite coaching staff of performance coaches serve as mentors and ambassadors for athletic performance. We are dedicated to changing the lives of young athletes and be positive role-models.

Our philosophy expands into the array of services we provide our athletes:

Whether you are a professional athlete or a youngster getting started, our programs will provide you with the tools and skills in a world-class facility that will allow you to take your game to the next level. Our coaching experience and energy about the level of teaching, motivation, and results we provide our athletes.

Whether your dreams include:

We have trained with all. From the 13 year old young athlete that hasn’t learned yet how to run properly, or doesn’t yet match adequate strength up to a professional athlete playing in the Super Bowl, our team has trained athletes to PERFORM AT THEIR BEST.

Regardless of your fitness level, the TSP coaches are here to help you fulfill your dreams and make them a REALITY.

 

ROSE BOWL AND SUPER BOWL CHAMP

KIM HERRING NOW COACHES KIDS AT

TRINITY SPORTS PERFORMANCE

 

The Ex-Safety’s Facility, The Only One Of Its Kind

In The Orlando Area, Focuses On Resistance Speed,

Agility, Fitness Goals and Proper Nutritional Choices

 

Former NFL safety Kim Herring may be the only player in NFL history to appear in two consecutive Super Bowls with two different teams. A second round draft pick in 1997, he had an interception in the Baltimore Ravens’ 34-7 win over the New York Giants in Super Bowl XXXV, then after signing as a free agent in the offseason with St. Louis, was on the losing end of the Rams 20-17 defeat to the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XXXVI the following season.

 

The Detroit native’s nine years in the NFL makes it easy to overlook his brilliant career at Penn State, where he was a starter on the undefeated team that won the 1995 Rose Bowl and became team captain, a first team All-American and All Big Ten—and finished as the #4 career interception leader in school history with 13.

An inspirational statement from his coach at Penn State; the legendary Joe Paterno, is prominently displayed on the wall of, and perfectly defines the philosophy behind Trinity Sports Performance, a 6,800 square foot, state of the art private training facility owned by Herring and his wife Marissa in Winter Garden, Florida.

Paterno said: “The will to win is important but the will to prepare is vital.”

Trinity Sports Performance, whose performance coaches work with children from 10 through college, and its subsidiary facility Garage Mama Fitness, which caters to adults, has grown literally from an informal start up in the corner of the Herrings’ three car garage in Miami in 2007 to the Orlando area’s premier training and performance center. It is now Winter Garden’s #1 fitness facility and was voted one of Southwest Orlando’s Best New Businesses of 2013.

 

Dedicated to changing the lives of young athletes and be positive role models, Trinity Sports Performance is focused on helping helping individuals and groups making healthy lifestyle changes by reaching and maintaining fitness goals. In line with Herring’s college degree in nutritional science, he and his coaching staff also teach their kids how to make proper nutritional choices.

 

The facility provides performance coaches for individual and group/team training sessions. Programs include Small Crew, Training and Power Training Sessions in addition to Sports, Speed and Agility Training. The facility features an indoor field, plate loaded machines, free weights, selectorized machines, ballet bar, outdoor training space ,among other state of the art fitness equipment.

 

When the Herrings decided to move back to the Orlando area, they searched for a facility for Garage Mama Fitness – which grew into a larger plan to develop a performance center in a region that surprisingly was lacking such facilities. One of Herring’s inspirations was Tom Shaw, former Patriots strength and conditioning coach whose Speed, Power, Agility, Reaction and Quickness Training Program is a leader in performance enhancement.

 

“I wanted to teach kids how to move correctly and efficiently,” says Herring. “Going to the gym or the YMCA is cool, but that’s not the place to take your son or daughter who is competing with other top athletes to get an athletic scholarship and realize their own potential. I knew this kind of training could work because I came to Orlando in my time in the NFL and had been to Shaw’s facility at Disney. I realized that junior high and high school students needs weren't being met in terms of athletic development.

 

“So while Marissa would create a place to build her Garage Mama Fitness, my idea was to use my background and get the proper certifications that i felt would meet those requirements. I started asking parents I met whose children were athletes where they went to train, and the closest place was an hour way. I knew that Trinity Sports Performance would fill an important niche, and it has.”

 

Trinity’s “Performance Fit” philosophy is simple: Provide athletes with the most effective, up to date education, training techniques, technology and coaching in a motivating, engaging training environment – and creating unmatched results. Their elite staff of performance coaches serves as mentors and ambassadors for athletic performance. This philosophy expands into the various array of services the facility provides its athletes: Strength, Speed, agility, quickness, power, plyometrics (“jump training”), flexibility, recovery, sports nutrition and vitamin supplementation as well as athletic life skills such as leadership, accountability and goal setting.

 

These are the foundational programs that help Herring’s facility achieve its goal of “taking your game to the next level.” Though athletic training is at the core of Trinity’s work, the staff is also dealing on a mental level with the goals and dreams of these young athletes, from those who just want to make their team to those who want to start for the team, earn all-conference or a college scholarship. As the facility advertises itself, “We have trained with all. From the 13 year old young athlete that hasn’t learned yet how to run properly, or doesn’t yet match adequate strength up to a professional athlete playing in the Super Bowl, our team has trained athletes to PERFORM AT THEIR BEST.”

 

Trinity’s founding game plan, according to Herring, was to educate kids and their parents about the whole spectrum of high school and college athletics. He breaks the stigma of perfection that comes from kids seeing too many commercials on TV that make them think they can have the skills of a 25 year old professional athlete when they’re 16. They don’t have the body type or physical maturity at the earlier age to make such a skill level possible.

 

Upon initial assessment of an athlete, Herring says, “I talk to the parents about what their kids need. Then I actually ask the athlete about what they think they need and their goals are. You would be surprised at the reactions because parents don’t always realize these things. A common problem I have seen is that kids are more sedentary in today's times and don’t move much while they’re in school and are prone to play a singular sport therefore not being as well rounded an athlete. Upon most of my assessments, I have found that the hips and back and core are the weakest body parts of young athletes that come to us as well as coordination specific movements.”

 

Herring is also a big proponent of “periodization,” which is systematic planning of athletic training. It involves progressive cycling of various aspects of a training program during a specific period. It’s a way of alternating training to its peak during a season of a particular sport. The aim is to introduce new movements as the athlete progresses through the macrocycle to specify one’s training right up until the start of the season.

 

“We help our athletes break free from the dogma of high school and college kids always training, by giving them a few weeks off and planning workouts based on a cycle that is centered around certain periods,” he says. “If you take these breaks, your body will thank you later. We alternate workouts and training to peak during the season or off season, and it’s not the same workout every day. I’m convinced that kids think they’ll do better if they train every day without stopping have watched too many TV commercials! You have to know how to change your training to what the kids are participating in; whether its in season or offseason, club team or high school team.

 

“I train both individual and group, based on parents and what I think I can help them on and what their schedule is like,” he adds. “My in season training focuses on a lot of stretching, myofacial, mobility and functional movement because I don’t want to wear them out, but at the same time continue to get them stronger by creating greater range of motion throughout key body parts. After their season is over we do more strenuous training to push power, explosion and muscle exhaustion in order for them to at up to 70-80% of their max workload during the end of the game.

 

“As a trainer, if your program is too rigid you will wear the kid down to where injuries come into play. Your program has to be flexible and change with todays athletes ever changing schedule. From what i have noticed through training and talking to my athletes and parents, high schools have been lax in how they train and what they stress in their training. Certain days we have our kids doing functional and mobility training as well as myofacial work instead of pounding an athlete in every workout. There is no reason to train your muscles to get big and strong if the ligaments and tendons around them are too tight to move them more efficiently.”